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Leukoplakia of oral mucosa

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Mucosa bequem und günstig online bestellen. Erleben Sie günstige Preise und viele kostenlose Extras wie Proben & Zeitschriften Wertvolle Rezeptur mit Myrrhe, Weihrauch, Curcuma, Phospholipiden und Niacin. Das Biotikon-Team umfasst Heilpraktiker, Ärzte, Biologen und Sportwissenschaftler With leukoplakia (loo-koh-PLAY-key-uh), thickened, white patches form on your gums, the insides of your cheeks, the bottom of your mouth and, sometimes, your tongue. These patches can't be scraped off Leukoplakia of the oral mucosa is a potentially malignant disorder, which means that there is an elevated risk oftransformation into a squamous cell carcinoma. The term oral leukoplakia is a clinical diagnosis for a predominantly white lesion which is not immediately recognizable as another well definable lesio Oral leukoplakia describes a white patch or plaque of the oral mucosa that cannot be characterised clinically or pathologically as any other disease. What causes oral leukoplakia? Oral leukoplakia may later prove to be due to one of the following conditions: Carcinoma in situ of the oral cavity (intraepithelial carcinoma

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Oral leukoplakia and other white lesions of the oral mucosa related to dermatological disorders White lesions of the oral mucosa often present problems of differential diagnosis, which are of primary importance when assessing precancerous changes in the mouth Leukoplakia is a condition wherein white or gray patches appear in some parts of the mouth, predominantly in the buccal mucosa and the tongue. However, leukoplakia is not limited as an oral disorder alone, as it may also appear in the genital area of the female This is a distinct disease which does not depend on a history of prior hyperkeratosis is a benign cancer of the oral mucosa. Nevertheless, it can be triggered by existing forms of leukokeratosis or develop under the influence of the same factors. Effected mucosa looks swollen and pale (greyish), and the boundary growths are blurred Oral leukoplakia, a precancerous lesion of squamous cell carcinoma, in patients with long-term pegylated liposomal doxorubicin treatment Hyperkeratotic (white) plaque / patch of mucosa exhibiting clonality and representing precursor lesion to squamous cell carcinoma Approximately 40% of leukoplakias exhibit keratinizing dysplasia (Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2014;118:713

Leukoplakia - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clini

Leukoplakia, also called leukokeratosis or leukoplasia is a medical condition in which plaque, keratin, and irregular patch formation occur on the mucous membrane of the oral cavity. It is characterized by the formation of irregular white patches on the mucosal linings, accompanied by pain, inflammation, and tenderness Patients with leukoplakia involving a large area of the oral mucosa might also be candidates for antioxidants, as might patients with extensive medical problems that increase their surgical risk. Beta-carotene is a carotenoid found primarily in dark green, orange, or yellow vegetables What Is Leukoplakia? Leukoplakia is a white or gray patch that shows up on your tongue, the inside of your cheek, or on the floor of your mouth. It's the mouth's reaction to ongoing (chronic).. Oral leukoplakia (OL) is a white patch or plaque that cannot be rubbed off, cannot be characterized clinically or histologically as any other condition, and is not associated with any physical or.. Oral leukoplakia (OL) is considered as a most common potentially malignant disorder (PMD) affecting the mucosa of the oral cavity. With the passage of time, the definitions of OL kept evolving. Leukoplakia usually presents after the fourth decade of life and is one of the most common oral PMDs affecting the oral cavity

[Oral medicine 8. Leukoplakia of the oral mucosa]

  1. Leukoplakia is a clinical term signifying a white, plaque-like lesion occurring anywhere on the oral mucosa. It is generally a reaction to irritation, such as cigarette smoking or tobacco or areca (betel) nut chewing, as well as an early sign of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection
  2. Oral hairy leukoplakia is a corrugated (hairy) white lesion on the sides of the tongue caused by opportunistic infection with Epstein-Barr virus on a systemic background of immunodeficiency, almost always human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection
  3. Leukoplakia treatment is most successful when a lesion is found and treated early, when it's small. Regular checkups are important, as is routinely inspecting your mouth for areas that don't look normal. For most people, removing the source of irritation ― such as stopping tobacco or alcohol ― clears the condition
  4. Leukoplakia is a condition that causes white patches or plaques to develop on the tongue and mucosa in the mouth. Mouth irritants and irritating activities, such as smoking, often cause..

Leukoplakia may be a premalignant condition. A white patch seen on the oral mucosa. It is considered a premalignant condition and is often tobacco-induced. When evidence of epstein-barr virus is present, the condition is called hairy leukoplakia (leukoplakia, hairy) Leukoplakia. Leukoplakia is a firmly attached white patch on a mucous membrane which is associated with an increased risk of (oral) cancer. . The cause of leukoplakia is unknown. Risk factors for formation inside the mouth include smoking, chewing tobacco, excessive alcohol, and use of betel nuts. Scully C. Challenges in predicting which oral mucosal potentially malignant disease will progress to neoplasia. Oral Dis. 2014 Jan. 20 (1):1-5. . Warnakulasuriya S, Ariyawardana A. Malignant transformation of oral leukoplakia: a systematic review of observational studies. J Oral Pathol Med. 2015 Jul 20.

Proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (PVL) is a recently delineated entity that is defined as a diffuse, white and smooth or papillary or wartlike area of the oral mucosa caused by varying degrees of epithelial hyperplasia.1In its early stages it i Oral leukoplakia are white patches or plaques that appear on the inside of the mouth (oral mucosa). It cannot be rubbed or scraped off and may be precancerous (early signs of cancer) or potentially cancerous. However, most of the time these lesions are benign (non-cancerous) and therefore not serious

A digital manual for the early diagnosis of oral neoplasia

The most common site for carcinoma in situ of the oral cavity is the inside of the cheeks (the buccal mucosa) and then in decreasing order of frequency: Gums (alveolar mucosa) Lower lip; The floor of mouth (under the tongue) Sides or undersurface of the tongue (lateral or ventral tongue) Soft palate. Oral leukoplakia Leukoplakia buccalis: Affects buccal mucosa; Leukoplakia lingualis: Affects the lingual mucosa; Based on the nature of the lesions, oral leukoplakia has the following subtypes-Homogeneous leukoplakia: Here the plaque is generally uniform, thick and extends over a wider area. It presents with a corrugated and wrinkled surface texture Kostenlose Lieferung möglic

Oral leukoplakia DermNet N

Oral leukoplakia (OL) is a potentially malignant disorder (PMD) of the oral mucosa. It has been defined as a predominantly white lesion of the oral mucosa that cannot be characterized as any other definable lesion.[1] It is also defined as A white plaque of questionable risk having excluded (other) known diseases o Leukoplakia is similarly applied by some authors. 6 Others reserve the term leukoplakia for lesions that show dyskeratosis on histologic examination Leukokeratosis, which can arise at any site in the oral cavity, occurs most often on the buccal mucosa and least often on the soft palate and gingiva ( Figure 1 ) Leukoplakia represents the most commonly encountered PMD of the oral mucosa. The reported prevalence varies geographically but also reflects differences in study design and populations studied. To make things worse, the term leukoplakia is used indiscriminately in the literature and th Leukoplakia, literally meaning white patch, is seen primarily on oral, vulvar, or vaginal mucosa. Leukoplakia in the mouth is seen mostly in older men with a history of smoking. Ill-fitting dentures and teeth in poor repair often are associated with this condition. Grossly, the lesions are elevated, sharply defined patchy areas of. Leukoplakia and erythroplakia are the two most common potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity. The prognosis and overall survival of a patient with oral cancer is dependent on the early detection of any lesion that might identify a patient with higher risk than normal or with early infiltration before metastatic disease

Oral leukoplakia - UpToDat

  1. Leukokeratosis of oral mucosa. Leukoplakia of gingiva, lips, tongue. Type 1 Excludes. hairy leukoplakia ( K13.3) leukokeratosis nicotina palati ( K13.24) ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code F17.209 [convert to ICD-9-CM] Nicotine dependence, unspecified, with unspecified nicotine - induced disorders. Nicotine dependence, unsp, w unsp nicotine-induced.
  2. Leukoplakia of the oral mucosa is characterized by impairment of the epithelial differentiation program. The use of complex phytoadaptogen in the treatment of patients with leukoplakia normalized expression of Fas-APO-1 antigen and keratin 17; increased expression of CD54 attested to activation of immune effectors. The clinical effect manifested in involution or shrinkage and loosening of the.
  3. leukoplakia A potentially precancerous white patch or plaque on a mucosa characterized by epithelial hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis, often caused by chronic irritation; leukoplakia-LP affects the mucosa of oral cavity, upper respiratory tract, vulva, uterine cervix, renal pelvis, urinary bladder; in each site, the significance differs ENT Smoker's keratosis A white plaque or patch on the.
  4. Three main types of oral leukoplakia are described clinically: 1. Homogeneous oral leukoplakia [Figure caption and citation for the preceding image starts]: Homogeneous leukoplakia Courtesy of Dr James Sciubba; used with permission [Citation ends]. Most common type. Consists of uniformly white plaques. Occurs mainly on buccal mucosa
  5. Oral leukoplakia is a potentially malignant disorder affecting the oral mucosa. It is defined as essentially an oral mucosal white lesion that cannot be considered as any other definable lesion.. Oral leukoplakia is a white patch or plaque that develops in the oral cavity and is strongly associated with smoking
  6. Leukoplakia & Erythroplakia. Oral leukoplakia, the best-known pre-malignant oral lesion, is defined as a white patch or plaque that cannot be characterized clinically or pathologically as any other disease. Analogous red lesions are called erythroplakia. Combined red and white lesions are also known as speckled leukoplakia or erythroleukoplakia

Oral leukoplakia is now defined as a predominantly white lesion of the oral mucosa that cannot be characterized as any other definable lesion. In addition, a recommendation has been made to distinguish between a provisional clinical diagnosis and a definitive one

K13.21 is a valid billable ICD-10 diagnosis code for Leukoplakia of oral mucosa, including tongue.It is found in the 2021 version of the ICD-10 Clinical Modification (CM) and can be used in all HIPAA-covered transactions from Oct 01, 2020 - Sep 30, 2021. ↓ See below for any exclusions, inclusions or special notation Leukoplakia is usually diagnosed with an oral exam. During an oral exam, your healthcare provider can confirm if the patches are leukoplakia. You might mistake the condition for oral thrush Leukoplakia (also termed leucoplakia, leukokeratosis, leukoplasia, idiopathic leukoplakia, idiopathic keratosis, or idiopathic white patch), normally refers to a condition where areas of keratosis appear as firmly attached white patches on the mucous membranes of the oral cavity, although the term is sometimes used for white patches of other gastrointestinal tract mucosal sites, or mucosal. Background: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the third most common cause of oral morbidity in India despite the numerous advances made in the treatment protocol. Aim: To compare the cytomorphometric changes of oral mucosal cells in normal subjects (Group I) with that of tobacco users without any lesion (Group II), tobacco users with oral leukoplakia (Group III), and tobacco users with oral SCC.

Leukoplakia and erythroplakia of the oral mucosa--a brief

Leukoplakia: Causes, Symptoms, Management & Treatmen

Not Valid for Submission. 528.6 is a legacy non-billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of leukoplakia of oral mucosa, including tongue. This code was replaced on September 30, 2015 by its ICD-10 equivalent. ICD-9 A white patch or plaque on the oral cavity mucosa that cannot be characterized clinically or pathologically as any other disease. The diagnosis of leukoplakia is one of exclusion; other conditions such as candidiasis, lichen planus, leukoedema, etc., must be ruled out before a diagnosis of leukoplakia can be made Oral leukoplakia (OL) is a white patch or plaque of the oral mucosa that cannot be characterised clinically or pathologically as any other conditions (such as cheek biting, candidosis, lichen planus and materia alba). OL is pre-malignant and is associated with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) Management. Prognosis. 'Hairy' leukoplakia. This is a white patch adhering to oral mucosa that cannot be removed by rubbing. It is usually a diagnosis of exclusion. The term should be exclusively reserved for idiopathic lesions when investigations fail to reveal any cause. The term carries no histological association ICD-10-CM Code for Leukoplakia of oral mucosa, including tongue K13.21 ICD-10 code K13.21 for Leukoplakia of oral mucosa, including tongue is a medical classification as listed by WHO under the range - Diseases of the digestive system

K13.21 - Leukoplakia of oral mucosa, including tongue is a topic covered in the ICD-10-CM.. To view the entire topic, please sign in or purchase a subscription.. ICD-10-CM 2021 Coding Guide™ from Unbound Medicine. Search online 72,000+ ICD-10 codes by number, disease, injury, drug, or keyword Oral leukoplakia represents the most common oral potentially malignant disorder, so early diagnosis of leukoplakia is important. The aim of this study is to propose an effective texture analysis algorithm for oral leukoplakia diagnosis. Thirty-five patients affected by leukoplakia were included in this study. Intraoral photography of normal oral mucosa and leukoplakia were taken and processed. Hairy Leukoplakia (HL) or Oral hairy Leukoplakia is a distinctive white coloured lesion of the oral mucosa. Picture of Hairy Leukoplakia. Image source- Harrison's principles of Internal Medicine. When the disease was first described in the 1980s, it was initially thought to be restricted and hence pathognomonic of HIV related immune suppression Clinically, oral leukoplakia appears as a white lesion that can have a wrinkled or dry, cracked mud surface appearance (see image 1). 5 The areas where these lesions can most commonly be found are the buccal mucosa, both the hard and soft palates, lateral borders, and ventral surface of the tongue. 5. Image 1: Oral leukoplakia So-called oral hairy leukoplakia has been defined in relation to a possible Epstein-Barr viral infection, usually in the immunosuppressed patient. Other viruses, human papilloma virus in particular, have been implicated in leukoplakia, while genetic alterations involving tumor suppressor elements (p53) have also been investigated

Oral Leukoplakia - Dermatology Adviso

  1. Hairy leukoplakia. Hairy leukoplakia is a type of leukoplakia caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. You may have this type if you have a weakened immune system - for example, you have HIV or have had an organ transplant.. It causes fuzzy white patches, often on the sides of the tongue, that look folded or ridged
  2. Oral leukoplakia is the best-known precursor lesion of oral squamous cell carcinoma. The aim of the present study was to compare immunohistochemical expression of antiapoptotic protein survivin in normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Method
  3. g Tang3, Shanchun Guo41Department of Physics, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachussetts; 2Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, 3Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas; 4Sylvester Cancer Center, University of Miami School of.

Figure B: Leukoplakia on the left lateral tongue in a non-smoker. The biopsy showed premalignant changes (dysplasia). At 5 years of follow-up this area has not transformed to cancer. Figure C: Leukoplakia of the cheek (buccal mucosa) in a smoker. The biopsy showed dysplasia and within 3 years this area became cancerous (squamous cell carcinoma) Mucosa bequem und günstig online bestellen. Erleben Sie günstige Preise und viele kostenlose Extras wie Proben & Zeitschriften The term oral leukoplakia is a clinical diagnosis for a predominantly white lesion which is not immediately recognizable as another well definable lesion which is white in appearance. Oral leukoplakia is generally an asymptomatic disorder of the mucosa with a prevalence of less than 2 per cent in the adult population

Oral leukoplakia, being a predominantly white change of the oral mucosa, is the most common potentially (pre)malignant lesion. It is a relatively rare disease with an estimated prevalence of less than 1%. Men and wom - en are more or less equally affected. Oral leukoplakia rarely occurs in the first two decades of life and is muc Oral leukoplakia (OL) is the most common potentially malignant disorder of the oral mucosa (Neville and Day, 2002; Haya-Fernández et al., 2004; WHO, 2005). Besides oral leukoplakia, actinic cheilitis, lichen planus, and erythroplakia are also considered potentially malignant conditions affecting the oral cavity Oral leukoplakia (OL) is the most frequent precancerous lesion of the oral cavity. Oral leukoplakia is defined by WHO (1997) as a predominantly white lesion of the oral mucosa that cannot be characterised as any other definable lesion. In 2012 van der Waal proposed a new definition which seems more oportune as i Oral Leukoplakia: It is defined as a predominantly white lesion of the oral mucosa which cannot be characterized as any other definable white lesion. Floor of the mouth is the are with worst prognosis followed by the tongue and then Lips. About 50% of the lesions in floor of the mouth show features of epithelial dysplasia, carcinoma in situ and invasive carcinoma Cancers of the oral cavity (lip, oral tongue, gingiva, floor of mouth, palate, and other mouth, including buccal mucosa) account for approximately 250 000 annual incident cases worldwide ().Most patients with oral cancers are diagnosed at advanced stages, undergo morbid treatments, and have poor survival ().Oral cancers are believed to be preceded by precancerous lesions, defined clinically.

Oral leukoplakia and other white lesions of the oral

Oral leucoplakia - Incorrect. Oral leucoplakia in its homogeneous form is a potentially malignant condition, characterized by a flat, unilateral, nonscrapable white plaque with well-defined borders and striations involving a single large site on the gingiva, buccal mucosa, and tongue Leukoplakia is hyperplasia or an uncontrolled overgrowth of the squamous epithelium (the flat epithelium that lines the oral cavity structures) and can lead to oral leukoplakia lesions White mucosal lesions may result from thickening of one or several layers of the oral epithelium. They vary in size and depth, generally have an irregular outline, and may be solitary or multifocal. Common sites are the buccal mucosa, lateral border of the tongue, floor of the mouth, and hard palate Tobacco, taken in any form, can cause Leukoplakia and aggravate its symptoms. Regular use of tobacco products may also lead to oral cancer. Leukoplakia patients should keep away from all types of tobacco products. Beta-carotene. Intake of 150,000 IU Beta-carotene, twice every week, can also help keep the problem at bay

Leukoplakia - Causes, Pictures, Symptoms, Treatment, Prognosi

Leukoplakia. Leukoplakia is a clinical term traditionally used to describe an oral white lesion that cannot be rubbed off or characterised as any other definable lesion.5 More recently, it was redefined as a predominantly white lesion with premalignant potential.6 It is the most common clinical diagnosis of oral white lesions,7 but does not have a histological basis The Oral Leukoplakia is even called as the disorder of the mucous. Causes of Oral Leukoplakia. Tobacco and Pan chewing are the major factors that cause leukoplakia. The prime cause for the Oral Leukoplakia is the constant irritation that is caused to the mucosa by either mechanical, chemical or any other means Leukoplakia is a descriptive term used to describe 'white plaques of questionable risk having excluded (other) known diseases or disorders that carry no increased risk for cancer' affecting the oral mucosa (Figure 15). 1

The most effective methods of oral leukoplakia treatmen

  1. Oral leukoplakia, the best-known pre-malignant oral lesion, is defined by the World Health Organization as a white patch or plaque that cannot be characterized clinically or pathologically as.
  2. leukoplakia. Oral Surg 1976; 42, 766-74. 5 PindborgJ J, Daftary D K, Mehta F S. A follow-upstudy of sixty-one oral dysplastic precancerous lesions in Indian Villagers. Oral Surg 1977; 43, 383-90. 6 Kramer I RH, EI-LabbanN, Sonkodi S. Further studies on lesions of the oral mucosa using computer-aidedanalysis of histologicalfeatures. BritJCancer.
  3. Oral leukoplakia, the most common oral premalignant lesion, is defined as a chronic white mucosal macule which cannot be scraped off, cannot be given another specific diagnostic name, and does not typically disappear with removal of known etiologic factors (Bouquot, 1994).The different types of leukoplakia in order of increasing severity are homogenous, ulcerated, nodular and verrucous
  4. antly white lesion of the oral mucosa that can not be characterized by any other definable lesion. The risk of malignant transformation of a leukoplakia is approximately 5 to 17%
  5. 528.6 Leukoplakia of oral mucosa, including tongue. CPT Code Assignment. 42160 Destruction of lesion, palate or uvula (thermal, cryo or chemical) Rationale: The physician documented that the patient has carcinoma in situ of the soft palate with associated leukoplakia. He used a CO2 laser to ablate (destroy) the carcinoma in situ and leukoplakia.
  6. Oral leukoplakia describes white lesions affecting the oral mucosa that cannot be removed by scraping or diagnosed clinically as any other disease. 1 The prevalence of oral leukoplakia is estimated to be between 2% and 5% worldwide and most lesions pursue a benign course. 2-4 A multifocal variant of leukoplakia, known as proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (PVL), was first described in 1985.

White plaques on the mucosa of the mouth. Terms in this set (24) oral leukoplakia. White plaques on the mucosa of the mouth. Dysphagia. difficulty in swallowing. Intussusception. Telescoping of the intestine. Diverticula. Abnormal side pockets in a hollow organ, such as the intestine. Esophageal varices Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and immunohistology techniques were used to assess changes in the stiffness and morphology of oral mucosa and leukoplakia samples at different stages of their progression towards cancer. The Young's moduli of the tested leukoplakia samples were significantly higher than those of the surrounding mucus

What is Leukoplakia? | Intelligent DentalDental Hygiene 101 > Dr

Aim: To study the proliferative activity of epithelial cells in Ki-67 antigenin patients with leukoplakia of the oral mucosa. Materials and method: A complex clinical and laboratory examination was performed on 155 patients with oral leukoplakia, who addressed the Operative Dentistry Department of the A.A.Bogomolets National Medical University. Oral leukoplakia can be defined as a white patch or plaque that cannot be otherwise characterized clinically as representing any other disease entity. This de facto removes the concept of leukoplakia from the histopathology laboratory to the clinician in terms of definition and utility. From a historical perspective, albeit erroneous, many. verrucous leukoplakia would correspond with some forms of verrucous hyperplasia, which will be referred to in the present paper. Banoczy and Csibaj and Banoczy and Sugar6 classified leukoplakia in three categories: leukoplakia simplex, leukoplakia verru- -~ From the Department of Oral Pathology, School o Leukoplakia affects the mucous membranes of the mouth. The exact cause is not known. It may be due to irritation such as: The disorder is more common in older adults. A type of leukoplakia of the mouth, called oral hairy leukoplakia, is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. It is seen mostly in people with HIV/AIDS Oral leukoplakia and other white lesions of the oral mucosa related to dermatological disorders Bánóaczy, J. 1983-08-01 00:00:00 J. BAN6CZY Department of Conservative Dentistry, Faeulty of Dentistry, Semmelweis Medieal University, Budapest, Hungary White lesions of the oral mueosa often present problems of differential diagnosis, whieh are.

Oral potentially malignant disorders refer to oral mucosal disorders with increased risk for malignant transformation, primarily to oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Leukoplakia and erythroplakia are the most common of these disorders, but others have been identified. Transformation rates to oral cancer vary based on multiple factors Oral leukoplakia, pemphigus, lichen planus, hairy tongue and geographic tongue are different typical conditions that appear in the oral mucosa. 00:00.1) Leuk..

lingual mucosa - Humpath

Introduction. Oral mucosal lesions occur frequently in older people Reference Lin, Corbet and Lo 1 - Reference Espinoza, Rojas, Aranda and Gamonal 4 and are important as they may reduce quality of life, represent pre-malignant change or indicate systemic disease. The commonest mucosal lesions in adults are denture-related lesions such as stomatitis, angular cheilitis, ulcers and hyperplasia. Leukoplakia is a premalignant lesion. 19 Based on numerous studies, the consensus is that smokeless tobacco use can cause oral cancer. 14-16,20-22 What is of importance to the dental practitioner is whether and when a tobacco-associated leukoplakia will transform into a malignancy. A review of the literature reveals two different opinions In 1978, WHO defined leukoplakia as a white plaque of oral mucosa, not removable by scraping, which cannot be characterised clinically or pathologically as any other disorder. 3 Recent publications have grouped leukoplakia with lesions that precede oral cancer or those that are potentially malignant. 4 HPV's role in the aetiology and. logical oral mucosa under local anesthesia. The control group consisted of 21 healthy volunteers. The mean age of the study group was 58 years. Intraoral photography of normal oral mucosa, LP and leukoplakia were taken with a Canon EOS 500D digital camera (Canon, Ōta, Tokyo, Japan) with a 13 mm macr A predominantly white oral mucosal lesion which cannot be related to any other causes and cannot be wiped off of oral mucosa is defined as oral leukoplakia (OL) [1-3]. This lesion is observed in 0.2% to 4.9% of the world population [3-5], and long-standing OLs are considered as antecedents of oral cancer lesions [4,6] with malignant.